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MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,702 admin
edited April 2014 in Everything Random!
Here's a few pics I've taken over the years. Mostly from my place.


Mammatus clouds. A good indication of possible stormy weather ahead.
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Big storm brewing
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You can see what's called 'greenage', sign of possible a violent storm. Which it was that afternoon.

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I've got a bin next to the garage collecting the water overflowing from the roof. Didn't help much because the garage got flooded with 3 inches of water.
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Here's a video taken with my camera, you might gather, me likes storms a lot.




Post edited by Matt on
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Comments

  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,702 admin
    This was the aftermath the next day.

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  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    Mammatus clouds.

    Someone knows their weather stuff...
    David
  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,702 admin
    Well I know the main ones, probably a dozen out of the 90 or so category and sub cats.
  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,702 admin
    Weather is going nuts in the last 24 hours. Very blustery winter conditions with lots of warnings issued by the Bureau of Meteorology.

    image

    This is Brighton beach in the bay.
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  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    Wowzers...well my old riding partner would have pulled the pin on me with weather like that on Beach Rd. She was a woose tho'

    Looks damn cold tho
    David
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Great to see that you Aussies are now using traffic lights
    Chris
  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,702 admin
    It's 9ºC here, freezing my nuts off. Windchill is 5ºC Brrrrrr. Winter has arrived.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 125 ✭✭ One-Sheeter
    CSM said:
    Great to see that you Aussies are now using traffic lights
    We never had a need for traffic lights until one day a car full of Canadians and hockey sticks went obliviously through an intersection and hit a police van. The policeman asked the Canadian driver why he failed to proceed with caution and he said: eh... I was aboot to stop but I was focussed on arriving at a friends for dinner of moose meat cooked in maple syrup. Sorry officer, so sorry, sorry... did I say sorry?
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter

    50s said:
    CSM said:
    Great to see that you Aussies are now using traffic lights
    We never had a need for traffic lights until one day a car full of Canadians and hockey sticks went obliviously through an intersection and hit a police van. The policeman asked the Canadian driver why he failed to proceed with caution and he said: eh... I was aboot to stop but I was focussed on arriving at a friends for dinner of moose meat cooked in maple syrup. Sorry officer, so sorry, sorry... did I say sorry?
    There would have been at least 5 more "sorry's" and it would have had to have been the Canadian driver who was not at fault apologizing to be a true representation.

    Also we only eat moose meat when the polar bears and beavers are in short supply.

    My conclusion - the Aussie car was full of imposter Canadians - so more than likely they were Swedes or Dutch
    Chris
  • 110x75110x75 Member Posts: 1,517 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Pretend Canadian aussies?
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    You would have thunk it!?
    Chris
  • 110x75110x75 Member Posts: 1,517 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    This is how the bunker looked some nights ago. I like fog.

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  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,076 admin
    I am still in mean mode. Am I suppose to say "cool!" or "I didn't know you lived on the set of Zero Dark Thirty?"
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
    www.movieposterworks.com  | MPW on Facebook
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    oh my...Armageddon
    David
  • 110x75110x75 Member Posts: 1,517 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Charlie said:
    I am still in mean mode. Am I suppose to say "cool!" or "I didn't know you lived on the set of Zero Dark Thirty?"

    :))
  • 110x75110x75 Member Posts: 1,517 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    David said:
    oh my...Armageddon
    We're doing fine!

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  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    Damn, you guys have tough weeds in your backyard!
    David
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    edited July 2014

    Sydney turned on the charm on Monday night with one hell of a sunset.

    But if you missed the spectacular colours this time, there are likely to be more to come with mostly sunny and warm days tipped for the rest of the week.

    The sun went down at about 5.13pm.

    For those who missed it (and those not on Instagram or Twitter), here are just a few of the photos people posted on Monday night.

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    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/environment/weather/instagram-and-twitter-go-crazy-for-sydneys-sunset-20140728-3cppv.html#ixzz38oho1cxK

    How to take the perfect sunset or sunrise photo

    Sydney Morning Herald photographer Nick Moir said the best sunsets tend to be "when the sun has actually already disappeared and only the high altitude "cirrus" (wispy, translucent cloud) and "alto cumulous"(cloud of parallel bands or rounded masses) can still reflect the light." 

    He said thunderstorms can also make for great sunsets if you can be in the right position to see formations like "mammatus" (sagging, pouch-like formations), which bulge down from the atmosphere.

    Top tips on how to take the best photo of a sunset include:

    • Put your camera on manual or tap your smartphone camera exposure button and expose for the highlight. If you want to capture great colour then expose your camera for the brightest element in the sky which will probably be a cloud or blue sky
    • Silhouette a figure, a structure, tree or something iconic in the foreground. It's great to give the amazing sky some epic scale. Composition is important, don't have too much black underexposed areas. Let the sky make the picture.
    • If you want to be photographed in front of an amazing sunset the you will need to fill flash. This can be difficult with a smart phone but you could use a strong street light, headlights on a car or a strong LED torch to equalise the exposures of the sky and the faces of your subject.
    • Another interesting shot at sunset is to look east and capture the last rays of sun on the people and faces with a dark or darkening background.

    David
  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,702 admin
    Wow, nature sure provides some wonderful eye candy for ones palate.
  • PaulPaul Member, Quad Master Posts: 1,559 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    It sure does, my phone has more cloud pics on it than anything else............I know how that sounds..
    It's more than a Hobby...
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    It sounds like you often accidentally take a picture while talking on the phone...a lot.
    David
  • PaulPaul Member, Quad Master Posts: 1,559 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Yes, but that's usually of the floor.... 
    It's more than a Hobby...
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    edited November 2014
    imageOK. It's officially warm at the moment. Coming up midday and I had a look at the temperature gauge, 37ºC/98ºF (in the shade), probably closer to 42ºC+/107ºF in the sun and getting warmer. 

    imageFortunately the temperature gauge is just a few feet from the pool, albeit the pool is currently 31ºC/88ºF and getting hotter. 


    imageMight dive into a glass of beer...

    Post edited by David on
    David
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,076 admin
    It's 72 F here... Great weather!
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
    www.movieposterworks.com  | MPW on Facebook
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    -15 with the windchill here!
    Chris
  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,702 admin
    Another hot one for you again today Dave.

    Had a cool sunset last night. Storm season is just around the corner.

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  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    edited November 2014
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    edited November 2014
    Never knew about this

    Stunning gallery of the Aurora Australis [link]
     

    Dramatic effect: The Aurora Australis seen from northern Tasmania.

    Dramatic effect: The Aurora Australis seen from northern Tasmania. Photo: Jason L Stephens


    For Aurora Australis hunters, those folk who devotedly chase the magical coloured knots, swirls and curtains of light that twist and unravel in the southern skies, the forecast is looking good.

    The natural lightshow caused by activity on the sun is likely to deliver some standout shows in coming years, as the sun enters an activity cycle that will send highly energised particles Earth's way.  

    Dramatic effect: The Aurora Australis seen from northern Tasmania.

    Dramatic effect: The Aurora Australis seen from northern Tasmania. Photo: Jason L Stephens

    Iver Cairns from Sydney University's school of physics said while it was hard to forecast, generally the sun had an activity cycle lasting 11 years. He said recent displays of light over Tasmania were evidence that the solar maximum phase was now dominating, meaning solar flares and coronal mass ejection were occurring more frequently.

    Professor Cairns said the colours seen in the skies over Tasmania in recent days related to the molecules that were being excited by excess energy generated by solar activity.

    But it's more than just a light show. Those with a trained eye know that there is a colour code to explain what particles are being energised.

    Red signals atomic nitrogen and yellow sodium, while green refers to atomic oxygen. Meanwhile, the movement of the clouds and swirls are associated with turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere.

    "They are magical to watch," said Professor Cairns, who also runs the research network Sydney Spacenet. He said sometimes the aurora moved like lightning – travelling at up to 100 kilometres a second.

    Launceston construction industry detailer and amateur photographer Jason Stephens is one of a growing number of Tasmanian Aurora Australis chasers. He became hooked after seeing a photograph 18 months ago that was so stunning he could scarcely believe it was taken in his home state.

    "It's quite beautiful to see," he said. "Sometimes I do forget about the camera and just stand there watching it."

    But as Professor Cairns points out, there is a self-preservation aspect to understanding the power of the Aurora Australis.

    Studying space weather, including the aurora, means being better able to predict the impact it has on the electrical currents in the Earth's atmosphere.

    "Those electric fields and currents have effects on, for instance, power lines, GPS signals and radiation damage to humans," Professor Cairns said.

    Fundamental science also benefits. But in a world where the global economy is built on electricity and space data is relied upon for communications, being able to manage and protect infrastructure is vital.

    "The importance of space weather, and being able to predict it, is increasing rather than decreasing."

    While Melbourne and Sydney only see the southern lights perhaps once every few years, Tasmanians could see the aurora up to 10 times a year.

    David
  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,702 admin
    Whoa...cool stuff there Dave.

    Another nice sunset tonight.


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