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The Magnificent Seven ( 2016 )

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Comments

  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 6,868 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    If you love Seven Samurai and you haven't seen them I thoroughly recommend Sanjuro and Yojimbo starring the great Toshiro Mifune as well. Even if you have seen them  another viewing wouldn't go astray.
    Lawrence
  • BruceBruce Member Posts: 689 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    I found out something cool about Seven Samurai 6 years ago, when I was consigned the only first release U.S. movie paper I have ever had!

    They were three stills (from the first U.S. release in 1956), and for that release, the movie was titled "The Magnificent Seven"!

    Here is some information about this I found on the Net:

    "5. The film was originally released under a now-familiar title: “The Magnificent Seven.”
    Seven Samurai” is an endlessly influential film, seeing the start of many familiar action tropes. Where would James Bond be without the opening adventure unconnected to the main narrative, pioneered here with the sequence where Kambei poses as a monk to thwart a kidnapper. And its influence was more direct, as even the most casual of cinephiles knows that Kurosawa’s classic was remade, surprisingly faithfully, albeit set in the Old West, as John Sturges‘ all-star western “The Magnificent Seven.” But what’s less well-known is that when RKO released the film in the U.S. (two and a half years after Japan, in November 1956), it was under the title “The Magnificent Seven.” When MGM remade the film, all prints of it under that name were destroyed."

    However, the article is wrong on two detail. The stills are clearly marked Columbia, not RKO, and the very first release was in Los Angeles in July 1956.

    Over the past six years I have waited and hoped I would get consigned any posters from this first U.S. release.

    Last year Heritage got the one-sheet, and even though it is one color and they got the year wrong, it sold for $4302.

    Below are the one-sheet and the three stills, the only U.S. paper I have seen




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  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 9,702 admin
    Very interesting...
    David
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 6,868 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Bruce said:
    I found out something cool about Seven Samurai 6 years ago, when I was consigned the only first release U.S. movie paper I have ever had!

    They were three stills (from the first U.S. release in 1956), and for that release, the movie was titled "The Magnificent Seven"!

    Here is some information about this I found on the Net:

    "5. The film was originally released under a now-familiar title: “The Magnificent Seven.”
    Seven Samurai” is an endlessly influential film, seeing the start of many familiar action tropes. Where would James Bond be without the opening adventure unconnected to the main narrative, pioneered here with the sequence where Kambei poses as a monk to thwart a kidnapper. And its influence was more direct, as even the most casual of cinephiles knows that Kurosawa’s classic was remade, surprisingly faithfully, albeit set in the Old West, as John Sturges‘ all-star western “The Magnificent Seven.” But what’s less well-known is that when RKO released the film in the U.S. (two and a half years after Japan, in November 1956), it was under the title “The Magnificent Seven.” When MGM remade the film, all prints of it under that name were destroyed."

    However, the article is wrong on two detail. The stills are clearly marked Columbia, not RKO, and the very first release was in Los Angeles in July 1956.

    Over the past six years I have waited and hoped I would get consigned any posters from this first U.S. release.

    Last year Heritage got the one-sheet, and even though it is one color and they got the year wrong, it sold for $4302.

    Below are the one-sheet and the three stills, the only U.S. paper I have seen





    A couple of things in relationship to the U.S. distributor and the U.S. release date.

    The Magnificent Seven in question was released in the U.S.A. through Kingsley-International Films. Kingsley-International Pictures was an American film distributor, located in New York and active between 1952 and 1962.The company specialised in importing foreign art house films. The company was dissolved in 1962 when the founder Edward Kingsley died. In 1956 the company became the art house subsidiary of Columbia Pictures. On the above four images, apart from'' A Columbia Pictures Presentation'' appearing on the three lobby cards all four images show ''A Kingsley International Release appearing on them. As 1956 was the year Kingsley International became a subsidiary of Columbia Pictures this is perhaps why the ''Columbia Pictures presentation'' appeared on the lobby cards. 

    I am not disputing in any way the information that the film had it's very first release in Los Angeles in July 1956. All I wish to do here is state the film was reviewed by the trade paper The Film Daily in December 1956 and Columbia was listed as the distributor. I notice also that was also apparently reviewed by Time in December 1956 also. Interestingly both being reviewed six months later which seems odd.


    Lawrence
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