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Sunlight on posters

Hello everyone,
A question before hanging my posters in my new house: I know direct sunlight on posters is harmful in the long term (Colors fading). But is a small amount of direct sunlight still acceptable?
For example, 1 hour a day when the sun precisely hits that wall?
Or is it really something to absolutely avoid?
Are there framing glass options that protect against UV rays?

Thank you!

Comments

  • Any direct sunlight will lead to fading eventually, even general light in the room.
    There are UV options, but nothing is 100%, it just slows it down.
    If the poster is going to be permanently on display, then my advice would be to pick something that you can easily replace, or dont care that much about.

  • Thank you !
  • edited January 2
    Any direct sunlight will lead to fading eventually, even general light in the room.
    There are UV options, but nothing is 100%, it just slows it down.
    If the poster is going to be permanently on display, then my advice would be to pick something that you can easily replace, or dont care that much about.

    I agree with Vesna 100%.

    I have been offered framed posters many times over the years and always ask to see the poster out of the frame before considering the purchase. The owners of the posters are nearly always shocked at the deterioration of the posters in the frames that wasn't evident until they were removed. Sometimes it is slight fading or acid bleed on the borders from the matt board. Slight to severe fading is common despite the owners of the posters saying that they have used "professional framers" and kept the framed posters away from sunlight. 

    The most recent example was when I was offered a collection of high end James Bond posters. All had been framed and all had various issues that had developed within the frame over the years. The owner of the posters was devastated when he removed the posters from the frames.

    If you are going to frame posters, you need to be prepared to pay for the best quality acid free and archival UV resistant materials and that doesn't come cheap. It is also wise to get the framer to put hinges on the back for the frame so you can easily remove and swap posters and check for any signs of deterioration.

    I often see posts by people who say that they pay under $100.00 to get their posters framed. All I can say is you get what you pay for.
  • John said:


    If you are going to frame posters, you need to be prepared to pay for the best quality acid free and archival UV resistant materials and that doesn't come cheap. It is also wise to get the framer to put hinges on the back for the frame so you can easily remove and swap posters and check for any signs of deterioration.


    That's my plan for when I start to get things framed (finally) next year. Watch this space.


    Peter
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