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Japanese Hinges - Making the Wheat Starch Paste

SvenSven Member Posts: 2,066 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter

I'm going to hinge some artwork using rice paper and wheat starch paste.

http://www.lineco.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=1250

Despite following the instructions the wheat starch paste was still little clumpy.

I'm thinking I might need a stiffer brush to mix, cook less in the microwave, more water.

Charlie Dario Mark and others ! Keen for your thoughts!

1. Place 6 tsps. Water in 4 oz. Container. Slowly add 1 tsp. Dry wheat starch, stirring until it is completely mixed.

2. Place uncovered container off center in microwave oven. Cook at medium-high stirring every 10 seconds.

3. After approximately 30 to 35 seconds of cooking, the paste will thicken and become translucent.

4. Cover and let stand until cool.

5.Strain a small amount of the paste through strainer (I used a tea strainer, some other websites say to use cheese cloth or Japanese strainer)

6) Slowly mix the strained paste with cool distilled water until the paste reaches the consistency of mayonnaise

***even at step 6 when I careful added the smallest amount of water then used a brush to stir it did not dissolve into a smooth paste... still tiny clumps!! ARGHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!


Comments

  • EisenhowerEisenhower Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 3,975 admin
    edited March 2016
    Hey Sven, I hope others will chime in to because I'm keen as well to hear exactly how Dario & Charlie mix paste. Here's my procedure which is kinda how yours is made. 

    1-mix 1 cup of pure wheat starch with about 10% Cal Carb for a buffer. Add 4 cups of water and stir up to a milk like consistency. 
    2-let sit in glass bowl for 60 mins to allow for soaking of wheat. 
    3-re-stir in glass bowl to mix up again and then pour into a non-stick cooking pan. 
    4-cook over medium heat, gently stirring the whole time. 
    5-after 5-10 mins the liquid will begin to thicken, and eventually become thick like thick yogurt. 
    6-continue to stir for another 10-15 mins and reduce heat so the thick paste does not bubble or burn. 
    7-take off burner, stir for 5 more mins to cool. 
    8-place lid on pan-let cool overnight in fridge. Use next day. 
    9-Scoop out portion and place in blender, adding distilled water to create "runny", honey-like consistency. 
    10-pour through strainer to get a "clumpless" consistency. I use a very fine wire food strainer. 
    ***i try to not add too much water so my honey like consistency has to slowly drain through the strainer. Here's a pict. 


    Hope this helps! :smiley:

    Post edited by Eisenhower on
  • SvenSven Member Posts: 2,066 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Thanks Mark! I might try to cook less in microwave + use a blender when adding the distilled water
  • EisenhowerEisenhower Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 3,975 admin
    Sounds good! Take some picts as your working, hope it goes well!
  • SvenSven Member Posts: 2,066 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter

    And it did go well!  Couple of changes

    1) used larger deep bowl

    2) Reduced the Microwave power to 60% and increased cook time to 60 seconds, taking out every 10 seconds and stirring (you picture helped mark, my paste was like a rubber ball first time round!)

    It made a nice smooth paste (not as thick as yogurt)  and slightly thicker after resting.

    On the first hinge I used the undiluted mix (to a thickened cream consistency)

    On the second hinge I used the dilute mix (to a cream consistency)

    I let both hinges dry for around 6 minutes before applying to the A4 paper.

    Second hinge wins (thinner paste) - seemer to be less noticeable at the front.

    Will do another practice round next week (maybe test cooking for slightly longer so its yogurt consistency after cooking but then again seems to be fine the way I did it?? ) 

     




  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,264 admin
    I bought a magic machine similar a cook and stir a while back... Best $120 ever spent.
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,264 admin
    Hey Sven, I hope others will chime in to because I'm keen as well to hear exactly how Dario & Charlie mix paste. Here's my procedure which is kinda how yours is made. 

    1-mix 1 cup of pure wheat starch with about 10% Cal Carb for a buffer. Add 4 cups of water and stir up to a milk like consistency. 
    2-let sit in glass bowl for 60 mins to allow for soaking of wheat. 
    3-re-stir in glass bowl to mix up again and then pour into a non-stick cooking pan. 
    4-cook over medium heat, gently stirring the whole time. 
    5-after 5-10 mins the liquid will begin to thicken, and eventually become thick like thick yogurt. 
    6-continue to stir for another 10-15 mins and reduce heat so the thick paste does not bubble or burn. 
    7-take off burner, stir for 5 more mins to cool. 
    8-place lid on pan-let cool overnight in fridge. Use next day. 
    9-Scoop out portion and place in blender, adding distilled water to create "runny", honey-like consistency. 
    10-pour through strainer to get a "clumpless" consistency. I use a very fine wire food strainer. 
    ***i try to not add too much water so my honey like consistency has to slowly drain through the strainer. Here's a pict. 


    Hope this helps! :smiley:


    So something I like to do for #2 - put it in a mason jar and close the lid.  Then after an hour I shake it up, pop it open and pour it in the hot water...  I also do all the mixing in the jar.  It eliminates all the spoons and bowls...
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
  • EisenhowerEisenhower Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 3,975 admin
    Very good! Sounds like reduced cooking power helped cook the starch to the right consistency. 

    There are a lot of cooking/soaking times among conservators...think Charlie posted this article about wheat paste cooking practices...i read it every now & then...

    http://www.cool.conservation-us.org/coolaic/sg/bpg/annual/v26/bp26-28.pdf
     =) 
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