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No idea what exactly happened here...

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  • PanchoPancho Member Posts: 547 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Only 80 - 120 posters printed? Wow! I guess my Blake stuff must be worth a fortune given they're so scarce...
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector

    Excellent information David and good to know.

    The question regarding Blake Films being out of business after 1980. Blake Films were still around in at least 1984 and possibly their printing was through another printer after 1980. If anyone has any Blake daybills from 1980 or later It would be good to hear about any titles printed in this period?

    Lawrence
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    Pancho said:
    Only 80 - 120 posters printed? Wow! I guess my Blake stuff must be worth a fortune given they're so scarce...
    You're on a winner.  =)
    David
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    David said:
    Pancho said:
    Only 80 - 120 posters printed? Wow! I guess my Blake stuff must be worth a fortune given they're so scarce...
    You're on a winner.  =)

    Still looking for an image of Jack The Ripper ( 1959 ) to surface. Go. Johnny Go! turned up recently so you never can tell.
    Lawrence
  • PanchoPancho Member Posts: 547 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    HONDO said:

    Excellent information David and good to know.

    The question regarding Blake Films being out of business after 1980. Blake Films were still around in at least 1984 and possibly their printing was through another printer after 1980. If anyone has any Blake daybills from 1980 or later It would be good to hear about any titles printed in this period?

    Off the top of my head here are several Blake daybills from the 1980s. The sizes all suggest post 1980 even if the films were from the 70s.

      
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Pancho said:
    Off the top of my head here are several Blake daybills from the 1980s. The sizes all suggest post 1980 even if the films were from the 70s.

      
    Insatiable and I Spit On Your Grave appeared to have been released theatrically in Australia in the early 1980s. Bloodsucking Freaks was banned by the Australian censors and no record or mention of a theatrical release has been located. I'm not saying it wasn't released theatrically in Australia but I am wondering if the film had the daybill poster printed in anticipation of it being passed by the Australian censor and the R certificate was added to the poster using the U.S. artwork from the 1980s. 
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Blake Films were still around in December, 1984 as the film Every Woman Has A Fantasy submitted to the Australian censor was classified for release on 35mm on the 1st of December, 1984 by Blake Films.
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector

                                                    Love Boccacio Style

    Before I comment on this title does anyone have any other versions of daybill posters printed for this film? It would be helpful to see any other versions, if they exist at all, before I make a comment.

    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector

    Love, Boccaccio Style ( 1971 ) was an film that was , according to official records, submitted to the Australian censor for public exhibition twice.

    The film was submitted on 35mm, passed  and given an R certificate on the 1st of February. 1975. The applicant was Columbia Pictures.

    The film was again submitted, this time  on 16mm, passed and given an R certificate on the 1st of September. 1978. The applicant this time was Regent Trading Enterprises. 

    Now comes the mystery regarding the two daybill images I posted earlier that appear above. Both the colour and the very similar duotone version have the distributor printed as being Cemp Regent Films.

    I pose this question. Was the official record regarding the 35mm censorship, that stated Columbia Pictures was the applicant a mistake that should have been Regent Trading Enterprises, the same as the 16mm applicant's name,  keeping in mind the distributor's name on both daybills?


    Lawrence
  • PanchoPancho Member Posts: 547 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Re-release or two styles?




  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Would you mind advising the full name of the printer's details on the above yellow version?
    Lawrence
  • PanchoPancho Member Posts: 547 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    It says "Printed by Brown Prior Anderson Pty Ltd Burwood Victoria".
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    edited June 2016
    http://www.proprint.com.au/News/337150,receivers-take-over-bpa-print-group.aspx

    Brown Prior & Co.  (sketch Printcraft House circa 1930)

    W G Anderson was apprenticed to Brown and Prior. He later worked in New Zealand but returned in the early 1920s to work for them again.

    The firm began producing books probably at Anderson's direction. In the early 1930s Anderson was invited to become a partner and Brown Prior Anderson moved to a new four storey factory at 430 Little Bourke Street.

    Brown and Prior retired but F Brown continued as landlord of the property that had become Printcraft House.

    When the firm became seriously involved in book production in the 1930s, Miehle letterpress machines and several Linotypes were installed. Total staffing exceeded 100 people — the bindery alone employed 30 people for soft cover and case bound books.

    The four storey building was serviced by a water-driven lift that descended much faster with a load of paper or type metal and made production a nightmare. The decision by the Melbourne City Council to phase out the hydraulic water lift service was the primary motivating factor behind the move to 5 Evans Street, Burwood in 1966 and a timely opportunity to change to photo-typesetting and offset printing in the early 1970s.



    George Anderson

    George Anderson (1878-1969) and William George Anderson (1889-1974), printers, were born on 12 August 1878 in Edinburgh and 22 April 1889 at Footscray, Melbourne, first and fourth sons of Thomas Anderson, shipwright, and his wife Elizabeth Ogilvy, née McDonald, both Scottish born. Thomas and Elizabeth migrated to Victoria with their family in the late 1880s. On leaving school, George worked for a Melbourne printer, to whom he was probably apprenticed. He later joined another printer, Bryam Rutter Gowan, whom he eventually bought out. Trading as Keystone Printing Co., he took Herbert Du Rieu, a jobbing printer, into partnership in 1912 and printed many books for George Robertson & Co., publishers. In 1916 Keystone became Anderson, Gowan & Du Rieu Pty Ltd, following Gowan's return as sleeping partner; George was managing director. When Du Rieu retired in 1918 the company was named Anderson, Gowan Pty Ltd: it concentrated on coloured brochures after Robertson & Co. curtailed publishing activities.

    On 23 December 1901 George married Emily Sarah Green at Fitzroy with Methodist forms; they were to have three daughters and a son. Although he had received only a basic education, he was an avid reader with a thirst for knowledge and had a prodigious memory. Having matriculated in 1907 at the University of Melbourne, he graduated B.A. (1918), M.A. (1920), LL.B. (1922), LL.M. (1923), B.Comm. (1927), M.Comm. (1928) and Litt.D. (1949). He wrote Fixation of Wages (1929) and was honorary lecturer in industrial relations at the university in 1930-54. His personal library of seven thousand volumes included incunabula and fine editions.

    President (1921-23 and 1931-32) of the Master Printers' Association of Victoria, he organized its jubilee exhibition of 1932 in the Melbourne Town Hall. In 1924-25 he had been foundation president of the Printing and Allied Trades Employers' Federation of Australia. Called to the Bar in 1924, George Anderson served as the federation's industrial advocate in 1924-41. He was active in the Economic Society of Australia and New Zealand and a fellow (1941) of the Advertising Association of Australia; he often spoke on fiscal and printing matters, besides contributing to journals and symposiums. A fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, he was president of the Victorian branch of the British Astronomical Association in 1953-55 and 1961-62, and also belonged to Rotary and the Melbourne Club. Survived by his daughters, he died on 3 May 1969 in East Melbourne and was buried in Burwood cemetery; his estate, which contained no realty, was sworn for probate at $154,000.

    After attending Williamstown and South Melbourne State schools, Bill Anderson was apprenticed to Varley Bros, printers; from 1908 he completed his apprenticeship with Francis A. Brown and Henry E. Prior. On 12 May 1914 at Park Street Methodist Church, South Melbourne, Bill married Martha Ann Waite. They went to New Zealand where he was employed by Whitcombe & Tombs Ltd at Christchurch. In 1918 he returned to Brown, Prior & Co. They prospered and by 1925 were able to build their own premises, Printcraft House, 430 Little Bourke Street. From 1922 the firm printed most of Robertson & Mullens's publications: the list grew and Brown, Prior & Co. produced many attractive volumes for them, including some limited editions. Bill was in charge of production; his high standards attracted other publishers to the house in a period when many local books were poorly produced. The firm became Brown, Prior, Anderson Pty Ltd in 1937, with Bill its managing director; in 1966, when he was chairman of directors, it moved to Burwood.

    President of the Master Printers' and Allied Trades' Association in 1935-36 and 1941-42, and of the Printing and Allied Trades Employers' Federation of Australia in 1945-46, Bill represented the trade on the Apprenticeship Commission, and served on book publication and manpower committees in World War II. His recreations were gardening and lawn bowls. Survived by his four daughters and two of his three sons, he died on 13 June 1974 at Hampton and was cremated; his estate was sworn for probate at $140,610.

    David
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Pancho said:
    Re-release or two styles?





    I really don't know. My guess is the M.A.P.S. version was printed first followed by a second printing, based on reduction in colour and credits, by Brown Prior Anderson Pty. Ltd. I doubt a re-release happened
    Lawrence
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    Why is one censored and the other not? Same nipples.


    David
  • PanchoPancho Member Posts: 547 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Oddly enough, just like the horror elements we've discussed, nudity seems to have been fairly randomly censored along the way.
  • DavidDavid Administrator Posts: 10,111 admin
    Perhaps it suggests the time (year) that the poster was printed...uncensored later?
    David
  • PanchoPancho Member Posts: 547 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    I think it may actually be the reverse. The M.A.P.S logo on the red version is the original logo which places the poster early 70s.
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 7,215 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector

    Pancho said:
    I think it may actually be the reverse. The M.A.P.S logo on the red version is the original logo which places the poster early 70s.

    Possibly the printing of a slightly differently presented logo was only due to the printer's Brown Prior Anderson way of doing it.
    Lawrence
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