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Flattening, Steaming, Restoring border damage (creases and wrinkles)?

naominaomi Member Posts: 35 ✭ Mexican Lobby Carder
edited February 2015 in Restoration
I recieved another poster with border damage. It never fails how some sellers so consistently wrongly priortize packaging. It's the rolled poster ends (borders) that need to be priortized and protected. People become so focused on using a strong tube ("a truck can roll over my tubes!" etc, etc) they forget the real work and diligence is properly securing the poster inside the tube from slipping and sliding. You can use a cast steel tube but if not properly protected and cushioned the ends of the merchandise within, the tube matters not.

Has anyone heard of pressing or steaming or somehow "flattening" border crinkles and wrinkles? Wrinkles that haven't lost any color or ink, just wrinkles and creases along one border from top to bottom. I've heard of a "flattening" process over the years but have never confirmed if such a procedure exists or is just myth.

Comments

  • DavidDavid Member Posts: 10,184 admin
    edited February 2015
    You could try steaming them, either in a homemade self contained environment or similar. One of those clothing steamers might work? I've heard it works, but I don't know whether it would work on the modern gloss paper compared to the older paper. 

    Flattening really doesn't take out the wrinkles/creases it just flattens the paper the creases are still there. For instance sometime Bruce might have a poster for sale that will say 'has been laying flat for a long time so will be sent rolled' - but look at it, the fold creases are still there.
    David
  • SvenSven Member Posts: 2,016 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Sorry to hear that Naomi, really frustrating. Well I can embarrassingly admit I have tried and failed with an iron on low steam with a thin cotton towel on top. Did not work and did not want to put on high steam or heat in case it did more damage. But for a moment prior to starting it was a nice feeling to think I had the most minute skill for any restoration ! Epic fail ! Anyway am sure others like Charlie and Chris can assist . Best of luck!
  • SvenSven Member Posts: 2,016 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Hey Matt any wrinkles you want me to remove from your Thunderball one sheet....give you special price :P
  • naominaomi Member Posts: 35 ✭ Mexican Lobby Carder
    Thank you both. Thanks for that tale of caution as well, Sven. I'm doig my best to redirect the urgency to "fix it". It's best left alone.

    It just seems I've heard people talk about a restorer, a professional restorer, maybe Postermountian that does have a "flattening" procedure without need for linen or chemicals. Maybe not. I'd love to know.
  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,975 admin
    Sven said:

    Hey Matt any wrinkles you want me to remove from your Thunderball one sheet....give you special price :P

    I'll give you something special.   b-(
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Postermountain has a cleaning procedure without the use of linen (used on a Them! one sheet on their blog).  I bet this procedure *could* also be used to soften wrinkles as well but not 100% certain

    Your best bets are to either have it backed or if it is vintage paper - which tends to relax and be much more malleable - lay it flat for a VERY long time with some weight on it...
    Chris
  • racer59racer59 Member Posts: 89 ✭✭ One-Sheeter

    Postermountain used a heat press on that Them! I don't know what it costs but but I'd guess it isn't cheap.

    If the wrinkling inst too severe I'd think steaming would probably be the best route. I've never tried it myself though. But it's an interesting idea.
  • PaulPaul Member, Quad Master Posts: 1,598 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    I would not recommend using steam as it could cause more damage than it fixes. Flattening will work, but only to a point depending on how bad the wrinkles are.

    This is my patented Waines poster press....


    image

    Time is another factor, as is weight.  I use toughened glass as you can see through to make sure all is well, and then add weight if necessary, like books or what ever. On bad folds/creases I usually give it a few weeks... 
    It's more than a Hobby...
  • PaulPaul Member, Quad Master Posts: 1,598 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    P.S.  note the extra weight/glass on the more stubborn creases...  
    It's more than a Hobby...
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,220 admin
    If there are no breaks in the color don't worry about it... But one trick is burnishing it. Take a clean white piece of paper place it over the area, and then take the back side of a spoon and rub it real fast with pressure. Test it out on another poster until you get the hang of it... The other method other than a heat press it the basically iron it. But you need a special sheet of polyester called holytex. Humidifying it really only works well on open celled paper ie one without the clay finish on it. Older paper or prints... So if it is a modern poster don't try that...
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
    www.movieposterworks.com  | MPW on Facebook
  • DavidDavid Member Posts: 10,184 admin
    edited February 2015
    Charlie said:

    Humidifying it really only works well on open celled paper ie one without the clay finish on it. Older paper or prints... So if it is a modern poster don't try that...

    He means steaming works on old paper.  :D


    David
  • naominaomi Member Posts: 35 ✭ Mexican Lobby Carder
    Thanks kindly, Paul, CSM, Charlie and all. Burnishing sounds like it may be worth while in this partiucular poster case. It's a clean crescent shaped wrinkle that repeats 8 times down one side on a 20 year old poster that, while oldish, still uses a clay composite coating. Thanks, Charlie.

    I'm going re-create the wrinkle on spare piece of poster for the test. I'm just going to use plain white Mead printer paper as the burnishing sheet.
  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,975 admin
    Could you take some before and after pics and let us know how you go please.
  • naominaomi Member Posts: 35 ✭ Mexican Lobby Carder
    Matt said:

    Could you take some before and after pics and let us know how you go please.

    Surely. Will do it..
  • naominaomi Member Posts: 35 ✭ Mexican Lobby Carder
    edited February 2015
    CSM, i'm looking at that THEM!. Wow. Thanks for the help there.

    I talked to John Davis about a different ship damaged poster that was also a contemporary clay finished poster. I love that he was forthright about what he can and can't do with modern posters in the light of what serves the paper best.

    It took me by surprise to hear a proprietor of a business say "Sorry, I'd rather you not pay me to do that to your poster", thank me for calling and express his pleasure in just discussing the poster with me. He really loves his work it seems on the good days and the bad.



  • DavidDavid Member Posts: 10,184 admin
    This is my patented Waines poster press....
    "Police are on the hunt for a thief posing as a plumber who is stealing the louveres from windows in the neighbourhood"
    David
  • PaulPaul Member, Quad Master Posts: 1,598 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Haha, that may be shelving dividers from their local Plum-centre.... but good Idea, could do with some more.
    It's more than a Hobby...
  • MirosaeMirosae Member Posts: 851 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    This is very helpful. I normally use books and have tried burnishing too. Though I like using books better. My main problem is with slightly thicker paper inserts for example. These folds are very stubborn. ..any suggestions?
    Rosa -
    Love some paper
  • jayn_jjayn_j Member, Singin Dancing Fool, Lobby Master Posts: 597 ✭✭✭ Daybiller

    Mirosae said:

    This is very helpful. I normally use books and have tried burnishing too. Though I like using books better. My main problem is with slightly thicker paper inserts for example. These folds are very stubborn. ..any suggestions?


    The thicker posters pose an additional problem.  Folding them actually causes the paper fibers to actually tear on the outer surface of the folds.  Flattening, soaking, steaming cannot solve this, so the folds are tough.  I think some form of binder might tie the torn fibers back together, but I haven't tried this yet.

    I am far from being an expert, so I leave this to them.  Is a reasonable strategy to use a binder on wet folds, and then an aggressive flattening?

    At my parents' photography business, we would soak, dry under weight and then dry mount, followed by pencil retouching of the fold line.
    - Jay -
    Curmudgeon in training 
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,220 admin
    I think it would be better to flatten and then work a thinned out mix of wheat paste or other adhesive maybe Methyllcellulose, which is less wet, into the folds and burnish flat.  This could be an easy experiment.
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
    www.movieposterworks.com  | MPW on Facebook
  • HereComesMongoHereComesMongo Member Posts: 870 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Probably an easy one for Poster Mountain but my 1968 Follow Me - a very rare rolled 1960s US 1S - got badly crinkled at top so PM charged me $150 to:

    The poster was gently humidified in a chamber and was temporarily mounted to a board using our proprietary gelatin procedure in order to flatten out the creases and handling damage. 

    Before:



    After:



    *****

    This process can be used for folded posters too if you don't like linen-backing. It can expand the poster however.
    Mel S. Hutson
    Charlotte, NC USA
    My reference website: moviepostercollectors.guide
    My Current Poster Collection



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