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Questions for Bruce-EMP

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  • SvenSven Member Posts: 1,957 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Not sure who  bidder Noah27 is, but they seem to like Aussie paper. They seem to have been buying up big all round on EMP lately. 
  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 852 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    It's no wonder - look at all that room for daybills!




    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • 110x75110x75 Member, Sarli Connoisseur Posts: 1,551 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
  • EisenhowerEisenhower Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 3,726 admin
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 3,660 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Sven said:
    Not sure who  bidder Noah27 is, but they seem to like Aussie paper. They seem to have been buying up big all round on EMP lately. 
    I wonder if its Nigel something or other reborn????
  • HereComesMongoHereComesMongo Member Posts: 797 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Another record low auction result from EMP!  devil 2

    Mel S. Hutson
    Charlotte, NC USA
    My reference website: moviepostercollectors.guide
    My Current Poster Collection



  • MattMatt Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,853 admin
    Sven said:
    Not sure who  bidder Noah27 is, but they seem to like Aussie paper. They seem to have been buying up big all round on EMP lately. 
    I wonder if its Nigel something or other reborn????

    It's not Nigel. I know him from somewhere.
  • 110x75110x75 Member, Sarli Connoisseur Posts: 1,551 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    There was another Shape of Water poster (the one with wooden pieces) that went way much higher than other currently for sale on ebay. Kudos to Bruce!
  • HereComesMongoHereComesMongo Member Posts: 797 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    In case you missed it:

    Did you know that large theaters in big cities in the 1920s and 1930s almost never used the studio issued posters on their theater fronts (or in their lobbies)? 

    When I (Bruce) purchased my first movie posters and lobby cards WAY back in 1969 (from Tannar Miles, a legendary early Texas dealer of movie memorabilia, who is still alive and well!), I naturally assumed that those movie posters and lobby cards could have been displayed in ANY movie theater in the U.S., since it seemed only logical that they all used the same posters (after all, why set up a huge nationwide distribution system if all the theaters didn't use it?).

    Of course, once I started to think about it, I remembered that the two movie theaters in my home town of Great Neck, New York only seemed to display one-sheets when I went there from the late 1950s through the early 1970s, but that might have only meant that some theaters only used some of the posters available, but that they all worked with the same group of posters made by the nationwide poster exchanges.

    It wasn't until the very early 1980s, when I started collecting "exhibitor magazines" (special magazines only sent to theater owners) that I began to realize this just wasn't true! The leading exhibitor magazine was MOVING PICTURE WORLD and  almost every issue from the late 1910s to the early 1930s (at least) has a great section called "Selling the Picture to the Public", which shows lots of images of theater fronts and theater lobbies (almost all from big theaters in big cities), and I quickly saw that they all only had displays they made themselves!

    Now in some cases those home made displays incorporated studio issued posters into those displays, but usually they were mostly cut up and used in pieces. And LOTS of those home made displays were INCREDIBLY elaborate! For example, when it was a jungle picture, they might have lots of real plants and vines all over to create a 3D faux jungle, and they also made "deserts", "tropical islands", "jail cells", etc.

    And they would often have mannequins incorporated in their displays, and sometimes the outdoor displays would be positively MASSIVE, sometimes covering the entire side of a multi-story building! But let me stress that I only saw this on good sized theaters, usually in big cities. When I would see images of smaller theaters (or ones that did not show movies on their first run), then those WOULD almost always have the studio issued posters and lobby cards on display.

    What likely accounted for this? I have been lucky enough to have had several consignors who ran movie theaters in the 1940s, and they told me that labor (and materials) was incredibly cheap in the 1930s (especially during the Great Depression), and that movie theaters were very profitable at that time (just about everyone went to theaters almost every day, in those pre-TV days, especially because most theaters were air conditioned and most homes were not!).

    So a theater owner could well afford the extra expense of really going the extra mile to make their theater front look super cool, and there was lots of reason to do so, since there was usually other theaters within a few block in a big city, and that great advertising might make people choose your theater over another one.

    In the past few months we were lucky enough to have auctioned hundreds of candid photos of theater fronts and theater lobbies from the late 1930s and early 1940s. These came from an amazing scrapbook that was discovered, and sadly they are just about all sold now. But you can see these candid theater front photos (and a few others we had previously auctioned) by going to http://www.emovieposter.com/agallery/search/theater%2520front/tag/xtype%253A8x10%2520still/archive.html

    And if anyone reading this has ANY candid photos showing theater fronts or theater lobbies, we would love to auction them (and as you can see from the above link, some have auctioned for over $100 each!). Go HERE to learn about consigning.


    *****







    Mel S. Hutson
    Charlotte, NC USA
    My reference website: moviepostercollectors.guide
    My Current Poster Collection



  • HereComesMongoHereComesMongo Member Posts: 797 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    And I do have a Q: Why didn't theater owners collect/sell MPs yesteryear? As you point out, movies were a HUGE HUGE deal back then. You would assume everybody would have religiously saved/collected posters from the BIG movies like GWTW. But only a tiny fraction survived. 
    Mel S. Hutson
    Charlotte, NC USA
    My reference website: moviepostercollectors.guide
    My Current Poster Collection



  • HereComesMongoHereComesMongo Member Posts: 797 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    RP1 yesterday: First time I've seen theaters use XXL bus shelter frames, not nearly as impressive as 1930s!


    Mel S. Hutson
    Charlotte, NC USA
    My reference website: moviepostercollectors.guide
    My Current Poster Collection



  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 3,660 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Theatres near me are going the other way.  No more posters, just screens rotating images :(
  • HereComesMongoHereComesMongo Member Posts: 797 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Yeah! 100% digital nowadays:


    Mel S. Hutson
    Charlotte, NC USA
    My reference website: moviepostercollectors.guide
    My Current Poster Collection



  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 3,660 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Nothing beats the feel and smell of a book...or the clicks and pops of a record  =)
  • jayn_jjayn_j Member, Singin Dancing Fool, Lobby Master Posts: 565 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Unfortunately, books have non-adaptable font sizes and control of lighting is external.  Add to that rapidly aging eyes as I approach 70.
    I could go large print editions, but many titles don't come that way, especially in paperback.  The answer for me is a Kindle app on an 8" tablet.  I can change fonts, backlight, background color quickly based on how tired my eyes are.  I can store my whole library on a tablet, so I can go back and reference stuff or choose the book that suits me this minute.

    What bothers me the most is that ebooks are not static.  The copy you own may change, even after you download it. I've seen it happen. The other weak point is magazines.  I have yet to see a magazine subscription that is well adapted to an ebook.  Most simply take a page image and display it as a picture.  Impossible to do any sort of search or text capture.  Worse, it is near impossible to get any sort of zoom that allows you to easily read the page.  Either the font is way too small or you are constantly panning back and forth on the page.
    - Jay -
    Curmudgeon in training 
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