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Hondo's Daybill Q&A [Re-Titled]

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  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector





    The Firefly ( 1937 ). Simmons Ltd Litho Sydney and Hackett Offset Print Sydney & Melbourne designed and printed long daybills. They have the same wording, but the same design is arranged and displayed a little different for each poster.

    One has to wonder the order in which the two posters were printed. According to IMDB The Firefly was released in Australia in 1938 and seeing the long daybill format daybills ceased to be printed in 1941, both the daybills in question would have to have been printed in the period between very late 1937 and 1941. 

    I have my thoughts on which one may have been the original release poster, with the other one possibly being a second printing design. We will most likely never find out the answer though. Before I comment further I would like to hear from any members who would like to present their views regarding the two designs order of printing. 


    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    Since no one has commented, I will now say that my thoughts are that the above Simmons Ltd Litho Sydney daybill, appearing on the left may have been the first of the two posters printed. I base this solely on the following two facts. The Simmons version is slightly more colourful and the couple pictured  in the bottom right hand corner has a slightly expanded image of the couple which includes a sabre hanging on the Warren William's characters side. 

    The Hackett version  I am thinking was a follow up secobd printing.

    No proof here, just solely my opinion.
    Lawrence
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Been a couple days since I checked in here.  I missed this thread...I have the one on the left (my OCD now will see me hunt for the one on the right too :) )
    It is a gorgeous poster.  I have no idea which one came first, but agree with you Lawrence, based on the quality of the one on the left.
    If I ever track down the Hackett version, can do a proper side by side comparison.

    I have a few other posters that are from different printers but essentially the same design (slight differences).
    As a general question, is it possible that the studios at the time relied on multiple printers to produce their posters, and thus while the design is the same there are slight differences?  Or is that crazy and one has to be a clear "first" with the other a definate second?
  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter

    As a general question, is it possible that the studios at the time relied on multiple printers to produce their posters, and thus while the design is the same there are slight differences?  Or is that crazy and one has to be a clear "first" with the other a definate second?
    Thats a very good question. There are examples of other posters with very slight variances.
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited October 2020

    My thoughts are that, in least this case, that the two posters weren't printed at the same time. 



    The above Simmons daybill version has some background of some sort appearing bebind Jeanette's head that is missing from the Hackett version.  The Simmons version has one only arm to be seen, with two arms clearly seen in different positioning on the Hackett one.



    Where may I ask is the top section of the guitar where the strings are attached gone to on the Hackett version? Hard to have played that one.

    The Simmons version is  a more detailed and better work of art, which clearly in my mind makes it the original printed version. The Hackett version would appear to me to have been a perhaps rushed second printing due to demand.

    Again, in this case, why would two versions of similar designs have been printed at the same time by different printers?  Printing of original multiple designs in the 1930s was common practice, but always the posters were completely different in design, and not similar in design at all. 

    Any other examples of daybill posters produced for the same film from the early years of Hollywood with similar designs, and printed by two different printers, I would love to see images of them here on this thread.. 
    Lawrence
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Hmmm, I have one sheet examples but not long dbs I think.  I'll double check this weekend
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Right so checked out my repository of images and the only examples I can find are Grandad Rudd and Million Pound Note Aussie OS...
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    Right so checked out my repository of images and the only examples I can find are Grandad Rudd and Million Pound Note Aussie OS...
    Thanks for checking. Any chance of seeing some images here ?



    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector

    Has anyone thought about what is the oldest Australian daybill that exists for a motion picture that we are aware of today?

    I would love to hear from anyone who has an image to share of what they think may be the oldest Australian daybill that possibly exists today. 
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited October 2020
    HONDO said:

    Has anyone thought about what is the oldest Australian daybill that exists for a motion picture that we are aware of today?

    I would love to hear from anyone who has an image to share of what they think may be the oldest Australian daybill that possibly exists today. 

     Anyone?  Please feel free to contribute at anytime an image of the oldest Australian daybill that they are aware of in existance today. I would really like to narrow this down somewhat.
    Lawrence
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Kelly Gang film?  isn't that said to be the first "moving picture"?
  • dedeposterdedeposter Member Posts: 110 ✭✭ One-Sheeter
    There's this from 1906 to kick things off (printed in 1910)
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Yah, that's the one I was thinking...
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector


    I think this is the original release?
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    Kelly Gang film?  isn't that said to be the first "moving picture"?\


    The Story of The Kelly Gang from 1906  was only the first multi reel feature length film produced in the World.

    We also have to consider that from the very late 1800's and continuing up to 1906 when The Story Of The Kelly Gang daybill was produced films were all short one reel motion pictures that were made and released, e.g. The Great Train Robbety ( 1903 ), which was 11 minutes in duration. How was this film and all the others that were released up to this point of time advertised, one has to wonder? Any daybills for a single title or of multi combined film titles posters perhaps? The theatres had to advertise the films screening there in some form or another. Was it just imported foreign posters only? 


    Lawrence
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    HONDO said:
    Right so checked out my repository of images and the only examples I can find are Grandad Rudd and Million Pound Note Aussie OS...
    Thanks for checking. Any chance of seeing some images here ?



    I was going to but can't get them to load here...leave it with me
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    Not the earliest example of an Australian daybill but nevertheless a very rare example indeed  of a still existing poster surviving from the 1910s. The French Spy is a short 3 reel film from 1912.

    I have some examples of daybill images from 1919, but the 1920s  currently provides us with the majority of  the earliest surviving daybill poster images.

    Back to my original question though, and we still have to beat the year 1906 with  Ves's entry The Story Of The Kelly Gang.


    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited October 2020
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
    HONDO said:

    Any other examples of daybill posters produced for the same film from the early years of Hollywood with similar designs, and printed by two different printers, I would love to see images of them here on this thread.. 
    In response to Ves's images of Grandad Rudd ( 1935 ) that were submitted.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

    Grandad Rudd later printing.                 Grandad Rudd later printing.                Grandad Rudd original release trimmed daybill poster.

    The two posters from Ves were from either the late 1930s, or from 1940 or 1941. During 1941 long daybills ceased being produced in this size.
    Lawrence
  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,409 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    I don’t know of one earlier than 1906
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,409 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    edited October 2020
    Another said to be from 1906 


    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    An earlier Australian 1904 daybill poster, and one beautiful example it certainly is.

    Theatre Program - Mr. J.C. Williamson's marvellous phono bio-tableau ... of the Russo-Japanese War shown at the Athenaeum Hall on October 22 1904. Image courtesy of the  Melbourne Athenaeum Archives   188 Collins Street Melbourne Victoria. 

    This particular copy of the poster was used in Theatre Royal, Hobart, Tasmania screenings.


    LINKS

    ·         Mr. J.C. Williamson's marvellous phono bio-tableau ... of the Russo-Japanese War image

    ·         The Williamson Bio-Tableau Wodonga and Towong Sentinel (Vic. : 1885 - 1954), Friday 21 October 1904, page 3 THE WIILLIAMSON BIO TABLEAU. Visitors from these parts to Melbourne during the coming Cup Carnival. will be able to witness one the of the greatest novelties ever offered to Australian audiences. "We refer to Mr J. C. Williamson’s latest achievement in the biographic world, known as the Marvellous Bio-Tableau, depicting moving and stirring scenes from the Russo-Japanese War, which commences its Melbourne season- at the Athenaeum Hall on Saturday, 22nd October. It is claimed to be one of the greatest biograph shows yet introduced into Australia, and the pictures displayed are not merely the newest and most up-to-date procurable; but in addition some authentic and realistic scenes of the present mighty struggle in the Far East are promised, and in view of the intense interest displayed throughout the world in this great conflict, more than ordinary curiosity will be roused by their presentment. Some of the subjects displayed are said to be particularly thrilling, notably a representation of the Bombardment of Port Arthur, taken at a long distance from Reuter's Special Intelligence Ship. In all over 50 pictures will be shown, some of them the longest films in the world, taking fully 20 minutes in passing. It would be impossible to describe all that will be included in this remarkable show, and as Mr Williamson claims for it the title of the greatest animated picture show on earth, we may rest assured he will keep his promise, as he has always done- to the public in the past. Special illuminated matinees will be given during the session for the benefit of ladies and children. The box plan is on view at Allan's 'Music Warehouse, Collins street, where seats may be secured six days in advance.

    Lawrence
  • dedeposterdedeposter Member Posts: 110 ✭✭ One-Sheeter
    Not a daybill but does this count? 

    The Salon Lumiere in Pitt Street.


  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    Not a daybill but does this count? 

    The Salon Lumiere in Pitt Street.

    Fo you have a date for this poster?
    Lawrence
  • dedeposterdedeposter Member Posts: 110 ✭✭ One-Sheeter
    HONDO said:
    Not a daybill but does this count? 

    The Salon Lumiere in Pitt Street.

    Fo you have a date for this poster?

    oops! I edited my original comment and deleted the date. It’s 1896

  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Towering Inferno Aussie OS...anyone seen or have?
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    Towering Inferno Aussie OS...anyone seen or have?
    There most likely wasn't one printed.

    The following is something I wrote regarding The Exorcist that appeared on this forum in the past.

    ''The majority of Warner Brothers films released in Australia in the 1970's, starting around circa 1972, didn't have an Australian one sheet version printed for them. The International one sheet that was printed in the U.S.A. was mainly supplied to the cinema owners and censorship snipes were applied to the posters, and in the case of The Exorcist it was a large R  certificate sticker. If you want an Australian one sheet the closest you will get is one that had an R certificate attached to it. Why throughout the 1970's there was a small number of Australian one sheets printed, when the majority of WB one sheets were just supplied as Int. one sheets is anyone's guess.''



    Australian NRC censorship snipe attached and New Zealand GA censorship snipe applied to the U.S.A. printed foreign one sheet version  used internationly outside of America for The Towering Inferno ( 1974 )..
     


    Lawrence
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,664 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Thanks very much Lawrence!
  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,409 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Interesting info!
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector




    Eye of the Needle ( 1981 ) Australian daybills. The first one was printed by W & B Litho and is 13'' X 29 1/2'' in size. The other poster printed by M.A.P.S. is !3 1/4'' X 27''.

    There seems to be a lot of interest with some members here on the forum as to which poster came first in cases of where two designs were produced by two different printers. Any thoughts on the order of release in this case?
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    I had thought, most likely just hoping, that with someone would throw in their two bits worth here. Anyone?
    Lawrence
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