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Hondo's Daybill Q&A [Re-Titled]

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  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,041 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector





    The Firefly ( 1937 ). Simmons Ltd Litho Sydney and Hackett Offset Print Sydney & Melbourne designed and printed long daybills. They have the same wording, but the same design is arranged and displayed a little different for each poster.

    One has to wonder the order in which the two posters were printed. According to IMDB The Firefly was released in Australia in 1938 and seeing the long daybill format daybills ceased to be printed in 1941, both the daybills in question would have to have been printed in the period between very late 1937 and 1941. 

    I have my thoughts on which one may have been the original release poster, with the other one possibly being a second printing design. We will most likely never find out the answer though. Before I comment further I would like to hear from any members who would like to present their views regarding the two designs order of printing. 


    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,041 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    Since no one has commented, I will now say that my thoughts are that the above Simmons Ltd Litho Sydney daybill, appearing on the left may have been the first of the two posters printed. I base this solely on the following two facts. The Simmons version is slightly more colourful and the couple pictured  in the bottom right hand corner has a slightly expanded image of the couple which includes a sabre hanging on the Warren William's characters side. 

    The Hackett version  I am thinking was a follow up secobd printing.

    No proof here, just solely my opinion.
    Lawrence
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,584 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Been a couple days since I checked in here.  I missed this thread...I have the one on the left (my OCD now will see me hunt for the one on the right too :) )
    It is a gorgeous poster.  I have no idea which one came first, but agree with you Lawrence, based on the quality of the one on the left.
    If I ever track down the Hackett version, can do a proper side by side comparison.

    I have a few other posters that are from different printers but essentially the same design (slight differences).
    As a general question, is it possible that the studios at the time relied on multiple printers to produce their posters, and thus while the design is the same there are slight differences?  Or is that crazy and one has to be a clear "first" with the other a definate second?
  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,266 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter

    As a general question, is it possible that the studios at the time relied on multiple printers to produce their posters, and thus while the design is the same there are slight differences?  Or is that crazy and one has to be a clear "first" with the other a definate second?
    Thats a very good question. There are examples of other posters with very slight variances.
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,041 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited 1:17AM

    My thoughts are that, in least this case, that the two posters weren't printed at the same time. 



    The above Simmons daybill version has some background of some sort appearing bebind Jeanette's head that is missing from the Hackett version.  The Simmons version has one only arm to be seen, with two arms clearly seen in different positioning on the Hackett one.



    Where may I ask is the top section of the guitar where the strings are attached gone to on the Hackett version? Hard to have played that one.

    The Simmons version is  a more detailed and better work of art, which clearly in my mind makes it the original printed version. The Hackett version would appear to me to have been a perhaps rushed second printing due to demand.

    Again, in this case, why would two versions of similar designs have been printed at the same time by different printers?  Printing of original multiple designs in the 1930s was common practice, but always the posters were completely different in design, and not similar in design at all. 

    Any other examples of daybill posters produced for the same film from the early years of Hollywood with similar designs, and printed by two different printers, I would love to see images of them here on this thread.. 
    Lawrence
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