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Posters by Greta Garbo

DavidDavid Member Posts: 10,307 admin

Greta Garbo (1905 – 1990), born Greta Lovisa Gustafsson, was a Swedish film actress and an international star and icon during Hollywood's silent and classic periods. Garbo was nominated three times for the Academy Award for Best Actress and received an honorary one in 1954 for her "luminous and unforgettable screen performances." 


Garbo's first talking film was Anna Christie (1930). MGM marketers enticed the public with the catch-phrase "Garbo talks!" That same year she starred in Romance. For her performances in these films she received the first of three Academy Award nominations for Best Actress. Academy rules at the time allowed for a performer to receive a single nomination for their work in more than one film.

Many critics and film historians consider her performance as the doomed courtesan Marguerite Gautier in Camille to be her finest. The role gained her a second Academy Award nomination. After working exclusively in dramatic films, Garbo turned to comedy with Ninotchka (1939), which earned her a third Academy Award nomination, and Two-Faced Woman (1941), her last film.

In 1941, she retired at the age of 35 after appearing in twenty-eight films. Although she was offered many opportunities to return to the screen, she declined all of them. Instead, she lived a private life, shunning publicity. Garbo never married, had no children and lived alone as an adult. She was something of an art collector and her art collection was worth millions at the time of her death.

In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Garbo fifth on their list of greatest female stars of all time, after Katharine Hepburn, Bette Davis, Audrey Hepburn, and Ingrid Bergman.[Wikipedia]
 

The Flesh and the Devil (1926)

Love (1927)

The Mysterious Lady (1928)

Wild Orchids (1929)

The Single Standard (1929)

The Kiss (1929)

Anna Christie (1930)

Anna Christie (1930)

Mata Hari (1931)

Mata Hari (1931)

Mata Hari (1931) Spanish poster

Susan Lenox - Her Fall and Rise (1931) Belgian poster

As You Desire Me (1932)

Grand Hotel (1932)

Queen Christina (1933) Belgian poster

Queen Christina (1933)

The Painted Veil (1934)

The Painted Veil (1934)

Anna Karenina (1935)

Anna Karenina (1935)

Anna Karenina (1935) German poster

Camille (1936)

Camille (1936) Belgian poster

Camille (1936)

Conquest (1937)

Conquest (1937)

Conquest (1937) Spanish poster

Ninotchka (1939)

Ninotchka (1939)

Ninotchka (1939)

Two-Faced Woman (1941)

by Steve Lensman
David

Comments

  • DavidDavid Member Posts: 10,307 admin
    edited September 2016
    Peter the Tramp (1922)

    Luffar-Petter (Peter the tramp), a silent film made in Sweden in 1922, was the first film in which the Swedish-born actress Greta Garbo (1905–90) appeared. Still known by her original name of Greta Lovisa Gustafsson, Garbo was at the time a simple, unknown actress still learning her craft. This short comedy was the starting point from which Garbo was launched on a path to major roles in Swedish and Hollywood films and to stardom.

    Presented here is the film poster for Luffar-Petter, which was created some seven years after the release of the film, when Garbo had already achieved international acclaim. Greta Lovisa Gustafsson is prominently featured in the poster and listed by her screen name.

    Also featured is the director, Erik Arthur Petschler (1881–1945), who is credited with having given Garbo her first part in a commercial film.

    (images courtesy of National Library of Sweden) 

       
    Henry B. Goodwin, the Bavarian landscape painter whose original name was Heinrich Buergel, became the most renowned society photographer in Sweden in his era.

    Goodwin redefined the subjects he photographed. He was an advocate of pictorialism, a school of photography that claimed that aesthetic merit was more important than subject matter. This belief helped him to transform his subjects into icons. He became an image maker, not only promoting the existing images of his clients, but creating completely new ones. In the case of the youthful Greta Garbo, shown here as photographed by Goodwin in 1920, he laid the visual foundation for an image that was global in its iconography and that purposefully eschewed national characteristics.


    David
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