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Questions for Bruce-EMP

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  • rockabilly777rockabilly777 Member Posts: 339 ✭✭ One-Sheeter
    I’m one of those very movie poster collectors. To me it’s always about the title, art and subject matter. It’s rarely if ever because I’ve seen the film or am a fan of who’s in it. I’m certain I’m in the minority in this hobby, but we’re out here.  :)
  • DavidDavid Member Posts: 10,307 admin
    Doubt you are in the minority, @HereComesMongo is the same.
    David
  • BruceBruce Member, Captain Movie Poster Posts: 938 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    David said:
    Doubt you are in the minority, @HereComesMongo is the same.
    I have noticed that those who collect on "art" usually don't collect for as long as those who collect by movie or star. I don't know why that should be, but I have observed that.
    We (eMoviePoster.com) hold 3,000 auctions a week, 138,000 a year.
    See all of our current auctions in one gallery here: http://www.emovieposter.com/agallery/all.html
  • rockabilly777rockabilly777 Member Posts: 339 ✭✭ One-Sheeter
    I always had posters on my bedroom walls as a kid, and there was/is something about movie posters that appeals to me, so one just grew into the other, I guess. I’ve had movie posters (mostly pre-60’s) for +/- 30 years now. Definitely not as long as some, but it’s been a while.  :)
  • PanchoPancho Member Posts: 620 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Pancho said:
    Hi Bruce,

    I collect Mexican lobby cards on the side and was wondering if you were aware of a database similar to NSS numbers for Mexico? Several cards I have have numbers written on the back that would seem to suggest some sort of system.

    Thanks!
    Hi Bruce,

    I assume that you don't have any info to share?
  • BruceBruce Member, Captain Movie Poster Posts: 938 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    That's the first I heard of that. Maybe that dude with the warehouse of a million cards knows about it. Remember that guy? Rod something? Every time someone died he ran lists of Mexican lobby cards from that person's movies.
    We (eMoviePoster.com) hold 3,000 auctions a week, 138,000 a year.
    See all of our current auctions in one gallery here: http://www.emovieposter.com/agallery/all.html
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,503 admin
    I think we need to come up with a new term for when you want to bid on something but you don’t because you think the guy you are bidding against is just going to just out bid you and then you’ll be stuck in a bid cycle for unknown 5 minute extensions to just eventually lose. I’ll borrow a term from college football - “battered EMP Syndrome” or BEMPS:

    Charlie, why don’t you buy as much as you use to on EMP?  

    Well Bill, I got a bad case of the BEMPS.  

    No!  Not the BEMPS????  I’ve heard it is really debilitating...  

    No kidding Bill, every once in a while I think I’m getting over them and Wham! I’ve just bid up a poster five times, only to lose after 30 minutes, and the next morning it starts all over.  

    That is terrible Charlie - is there a cure? 

    Well now now that you mention it Bill, there is. For only $49.99 I’ll tell you my four step BEMPS cure...

    To get you started, I’ll reveal the first Step:

    Step 1: Stop collecting movie posters...

     :D 
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
  • BruceBruce Member, Captain Movie Poster Posts: 938 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Some people do as you describe, and bid with 5 minutes to go, and then wait 5 minutes. Of course, that becomes agonizing when the other fellow waits 4 minutes 55 seconds, and then bids, and then repeats that over and over. I don't follow this when it occurs, so I can't say how often it does, EXCEPT when it is one of the last items closing on the night, because I can't activate the new auctions until every current one ends, and then it is excruciating for me, because sometimes I am stuck waiting 20 or 30 minutes for that last auction to end.

    But aside from being annoying, the above is the absolute best strategy for bidding, because, if you only bid one bid over the other person with five minutes to go, then they can't "chip away" at your high bid by bidding over and over.

    But another strategy IS to simply pick a number that is the highest you are willing to go, and then bid that with 5 minutes to go, and then close the auction and come back after it is over and see if you won or not. The trick is finding that magic number where, if you get outbid, you don't think, "I wish I had bid more" and ALSO where, if you end up paying your max, you don't think "I shouldn't have bid so much"!
    We (eMoviePoster.com) hold 3,000 auctions a week, 138,000 a year.
    See all of our current auctions in one gallery here: http://www.emovieposter.com/agallery/all.html
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,503 admin
    That is what worked on those banners. I just threw down a bid and forgot about it.
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
  • EisenhowerEisenhower Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 4,295 admin

    don't most people bid right before the 5 min mark to hopefully catch someone not watching the closing? To think if the other person isn't watching, they'll win in it?

    As many have, I've gotten caught up in two bidding duels and both times, I think I over paid. I may bid once, not my highest, but usually wait until its about to close.

  • BruceBruce Member, Captain Movie Poster Posts: 938 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Definitely, your best strategy is to bid once as close to the five minute mark as possible, and then go away. 

    Bidding your max early usually results in your getting outbid (unless you bid REALLY high), and bidding over and over again at the end usually results in your getting "auction fever" and overpaying.

    And more and more bidders are switching to this strategy. In the past, I would know that whatever the total of all the auctions was on Tuesday or Thursday morning would be doubled by the time the last auction ended. In recent months, the overall total has sometimes TRIPLED in the last 12 hours.

    And of course it is not "across the board". Some items go up ten times at the end, and others reach their final price days before the end.
    We (eMoviePoster.com) hold 3,000 auctions a week, 138,000 a year.
    See all of our current auctions in one gallery here: http://www.emovieposter.com/agallery/all.html
  • DavidDavid Member Posts: 10,307 admin
    edited December 2018
    Over the years I have had five bidding styles, follow and learn Grasshopper..
    1. I've bid, forgotten, and won
    2. I've bid, forgotten, and lost
    3. I've fought it out and lost
    4. I've fought it out and won and overpaid
    5. I've fought it out and won it for a good price
    Post edited by David on
    David
  • jayn_jjayn_j Member, Singin Dancing Fool, Lobby Master Posts: 660 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Well, I usually put in a token bid early.  What that does is set up my bids.  Then I wait until near the end.  Can't say 5 minutes because often I am busy.  I just put in max I am willing to pay and go away.

    Where it doesn't work is when there are more items I have a mild interest in than I have budget,  In this case, I will pick the few and put in my best bid, but I need to monitor.  If I get outbid, I can go to the next one on my list and bid there, but it does take active monitoring.
    - Jay -
    Curmudgeon in training 
  • smusssmuss Member Posts: 12 ✭ Mexican Lobby Carder
    Bruce,

    Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions, and I would like to complement you and your staff on their courtesy and professionalism.

    I have questions about buying and selling linen backed posters on EMP. 

    While linen backing and restoration is expensive and/or time consuming it does not seem that linen backed paper bids reflect the value of the linen back and restoration process. I'll frequently see linen backed posters that go for less than the same poster at even a lower condition.  As a buyer it is good of course I have bought a few. But as someone considering consigning some linen backed posters it seems treacherous.  Do the linen backs sell for more overall, or is it just my jaded perception?  Are there some genres or time period posters that are not worth linen backing? (of course linen backing five dollar posters isn't worth it) Is there any seasonality for linen backed or specific genre posters?
  • jayn_jjayn_j Member, Singin Dancing Fool, Lobby Master Posts: 660 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Bruce will answer more completely and better, but take a look around the site.  There are a lot of pros and cons on linenbacking.  Many folks will not touch a linenbacked poster.  They feel they detract from the authenticity.

    In general, linenbacked posters tend to go for a slight premium over the average unbacked one, but a mint unbacked one will generally get the top dollar.  My feeling is that you should back if the poster needs to be conserved to keep it from faiiling apart, but you should never expect to recover the costs of backing when you sell.
    - Jay -
    Curmudgeon in training 
  • BruceBruce Member, Captain Movie Poster Posts: 938 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    There are some basic things about linenbacking everyone should know:

    1) The posters divide into ones you CAN find unbacked, and the ones you likely will rarely or never find unbacked.

    If you are talking about the first type, my opinion is you should probably only buy a linenbacked example if you are going to frame it and are unlikely to ever re-sell it. If you don't want to frame it, or are planning on re-selling it, then you will do far better in the long run if you buy an unbacked example.

    If you are talking about the second type, you probably HAVE to get a linenbacked example, because you might never get a chance at an unbacked one!

    2) Yes, often backed posters do not go up in price by the added cost of backing, and sometimes sell for under the cost of linenbacking alone. So bear this in mind, and look to buy ones at auction already backed, so YOU can get those great deals, rather than be the one who pays for backing and then sells at a loss.

    3) A heavily restored poster rarely is worth close to an unrestored example of the same poster, and sometimes sells for one-half or less. The main exception to this is when heavily restored posters are auctioned by auction houses that knowingly or unknowingly do not reveal the extend of the restoration, and sometimes find unsophisticated buyers who bid assuming the poster is in better condition than they thought it was, because they were deceived.

    So if YOU have a heavily restored poster and want to auction it, do NOT consign it to an auction that will honestly describe the restoration. Consign it to the auction that may well gloss over its flaws and over-grade it. Of course, this assumes you don't mind being an accomplice to deception.

    4) Some posters have "negative value". They have so much damage that they can't be displayed, and yet the cost of restoration is more than an unrestored example of that poster would sell for, so it truly is worth less than nothing.

    5) A HIGH percentage of backed posters ARE ones you likely will rarely or never find unbacked. They also are the kinds of posters that are so fragile that you likely would never display unbacked even if you could. On those, linenbacking is absolutely fine, and just about everyone who collects such posters has NO problem whatsoever with backing, AS LONG AS it was done well, and the amount of restoration is honestly disclosed.
    We (eMoviePoster.com) hold 3,000 auctions a week, 138,000 a year.
    See all of our current auctions in one gallery here: http://www.emovieposter.com/agallery/all.html
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