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Gone With the Wind Australian one sheet

JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
Curious as to what everyone thinks about this Gone With the Wind Australian one sheet. It was described at auction as a 1942 reissue. Printer is Hackett Offset Print SYD & MELB. The poster has a hand written date at the top but not sure how significant that is. Is it a 1942 or 1944 release or perhaps original release? 


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Comments

  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,419 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,419 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector




    Let's not forget this Australian one sheet ?
    Lawrence
  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    edited January 23
    HONDO said:




    Let's not forget this Australian one sheet ?
    I have always thought that it is very hard to believe that this would be the true first release Australian one sheet for GWTW.
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
     John said:
    I have always thought that it is very hard to believe that this would be the true first release Australian one sheet for GWTW.

    Agree, and the key to establishing when the following one sheet was released is the printer's name. Unfortunately the name of the printer is very difficult to read on this copy, which appears to be only copy I have ever seen.

     

    I believe I know the name of the printer, but I need definite confirmation. Does anyone know the name of the printer or at least would like to state their opinion to what it is? 
    Lawrence
  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    edited January 23
    It looks like Hackett but cant be sure
    Post edited by John on
  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,419 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    For the record the date noted on the poster is at least accurate April 25, 26, 27 - 1944 were indeed a Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday  B)
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    The reference to the Roxy Theatre seems to have been associated with the original daybills that have appeared.
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    John said:
    It looks like Hackett but cant be sure


    I think it is most likely Hackett Offset Print Syd. Melb. Befote I make any further comments I would really like to have this thinking confirmed.
    Lawrence
  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    HONDO said:
    John said:
    It looks like Hackett but cant be sure


    I think it is most likely Hackett Offset Print Syd. Melb. Befote I make any further comments I would really like to have this thinking confirmed.
    It is almost certainly Hackett. From memory, I think David may have had the poster so he might be able to confirm it but why not let us know what your thinking is based on it being Hackett.
  • darolodarolo Member Posts: 56 ✭✭ One-Sheeter
    That GWTW 1 sheet was owned by the late Bill Collins, someone (probably much later) put 1944 on it, working it out from the date at the top, obviously no cinema would need to put the year of screening. I noticed the same auction that had this poster had an Australian press manual with the posters pictured including a same designed 1 sheet, I think that manual would be the original Australian one and this poster would be the first Australian release (1940). 
  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    darolo said:
    That GWTW 1 sheet was owned by the late Bill Collins, someone (probably much later) put 1944 on it, working it out from the date at the top, obviously no cinema would need to put the year of screening. I noticed the same auction that had this poster had an Australian press manual with the posters pictured including a same designed 1 sheet, I think that manual would be the original Australian one and this poster would be the first Australian release (1940). 
    Yes. I wonder what led them to describe it as a 1942 release.
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    John said:
    HONDO said:
    John said:
    It looks like Hackett but cant be sure


    I think it is most likely Hackett Offset Print Syd. Melb. Befote I make any further comments I would really like to have this thinking confirmed.
    It is almost certainly Hackett. From memory, I think David may have had the poster so he might be able to confirm it but why not let us know what your thinking is based on it being Hackett.

    My thinking then regarding this version of the alternative Gone With The Wnd Australian one sheet.

    This version would appear to be an early second printing if the printer is indeed Hackett Offset Print Syd. Melb, which I am firmly of the opinion that it is. 

    Gone With The Wind premiered in Sydney, according to IMDB, on 30 April  1940. The early part of the Australian release it played only in capitol cities, following shortly after this played only in selective key venues outside of the capitols. With one of these venues I found the following advertisemenr - ''Gone With The Wind not screened anywhere except at increased admission pricws for at least one year''. 

    In 1938 Offset Printing Co. Pty. Ltd. acquired the business of R.G.W. Hackett and A.E.Oates. After this both Offset Printing Co.Pty.Ltd.and Hackett Offset Printing Co., both continued to design and print Australian  posters as two individual companies.


    Ronald Gordon William Hackett was to become the managing director of Offset. 

    In at least 195I both companies were listed as being at 169 Phillip Street, Waterloo in Sydney.

    Hackett discontinued printing film posters under that name in circa 1941, with Offset continuing on doing so until circa 1958. An odd exception under the Hackett name  was an Australian 3 sheet  printed for Universal-International in 1952 titled Lost In Alaska.  


    Hackett Offset still operated in book designs in at least 1951 when this advertisement was placed. 

    Taking into account this information it would certainly appear to me that the poster here in question would have been priinted prior to 1942 as a follow up printing, most likely due to demand.

    An interesting thing I have found is that GWTW was revived in Australia in 1943, and in Perth when screened ''at popular prices'' the film ran longer in it's 1943 revival season than on it's first release there in 1940.

    Lawrence
  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,419 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    darolo said:
    That GWTW 1 sheet was owned by the late Bill Collins, someone (probably much later) put 1944 on it, working it out from the date at the top, obviously no cinema would need to put the year of screening. I noticed the same auction that had this poster had an Australian press manual with the posters pictured including a same designed 1 sheet, I think that manual would be the original Australian one and this poster would be the first Australian release (1940). 
    Do you by chance have a link to the press sheet in the auction?  I actually looked through the auction earlier thinking the press sheet might be there but I did not come across it for some reason!
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    HONDO said:
    John said:
    HONDO said:
    John said:
    It looks like Hackett but cant be sure


    I think it is most likely Hackett Offset Print Syd. Melb. Befote I make any further comments I would really like to have this thinking confirmed.
    It is almost certainly Hackett. From memory, I think David may have had the poster so he might be able to confirm it but why not let us know what your thinking is based on it being Hackett.

    My thinking then regarding this version of the alternative Gone With The Wnd Australian one sheet.

    This version would appear to be an early second printing if the printer is indeed Hackett Offset Print Syd. Melb, which I am firmly of the opinion that it is. 

    Gone With The Wind premiered in Sydney, according to IMDB, on 30 April  1940. The early part of the Australian release it played only in capitol cities, following shortly after this played only in selective key venues outside of the capitols. With one of these venues I found the following advertisemenr - ''Gone With The Wind not screened anywhere except at increased admission pricws for at least one year''. 

    In 1938 Offset Printing Co. Pty. Ltd. acquired the business of R.G.W. Hackett and A.E.Oates. After this both Offset Printing Co.Pty.Ltd.and Hackett Offset Printing Co., both continued to design and print Australian  posters as two individual companies.


    Ronald Gordon William Hackett was to become the managing director of Offset. 

    In at least 195I both companies were listed as being at 169 Phillip Street, Waterloo in Sydney.

    Hackett discontinued printing film posters under that name in circa 1941, with Offset continuing on doing so until circa 1958. An odd exception under the Hackett name  was an Australian 3 sheet  printed for Universal-International in 1952 titled Lost In Alaska.  


    Hackett Offset still operated in book designs in at least 1951 when this advertisement was placed. 

    Taking into account this information it would certainly appear to me that the poster here in question would have been priinted prior to 1942 as a follow up printing, most likely due to demand.

    An interesting thing I have found is that GWTW was revived in Australia in 1943, and in Perth when screened ''at popular prices'' the film ran longer in it's 1943 revival season than on it's first release there in 1940.

    So just to clarify the one sheet with the text only is a second printing. I would definitely agree with that. What exactly are you calling the Bill Collins one sheet?
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    John Said:

    So just to clarify the one sheet with the text only is a second printing. I would definitely agree with that. What exactly are you calling the Bill Collins one sheet?

    My answer is that the Bill Collins poster, based on the evidence presented, has to be from the 1940 Australian roadshow first release. This then confirms my earlier thinking that this was probably the case.

    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited January 24
    darolo said:
    That GWTW 1 sheet was owned by the late Bill Collins, someone (probably much later) put 1944 on it, working it out from the date at the top, obviously no cinema would need to put the year of screening. I noticed the same auction that had this poster had an Australian press manual with the posters pictured including a same designed 1 sheet, I think that manual would be the original Australian one and this poster would be the first Australian release (1940). 
     The publicity  material following  appears to be from both the U.S.A. and Australia and not just from Australia as earlier suggested. The material would appear to have originated from three different original sources. The first two certainly appear to be from the U.S.A. and if Bruce would confilm this it would be great. The following two are definately from the U.S.A. and the final two are Australian flyers from the 1940 Australian first release.                                                                                                                             
    Although I still think the Bill Collins poster is from 1940, is the proof still there to back this up? Bruce's imput on the Posters and Accessories origins will be essential to determine this one way or the other.




    Post edited by HONDO on
    Lawrence
  • BruceBruce Member, Captain Movie Poster Posts: 1,128 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    "Although I still think the Bill Collins poster is from 1940, is the proof still there to back this up? Bruce's imput on the Posters and Accessories origins will be essential to determine this one way or the other."

    Does this refer to Theodore Bruce?

    And what are you asking about the Posters and Accessories origins?

    I am very confused!
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  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector

    Sorry Bruce for any confusion unitentionaly caused. I thought my request was clear enough as to what I was asking. All I was wanting you to do to confirm if the following two images are from the U.S. or not. 

    You have confused me now with the mention of Theodore Bruce. Drawn a blank here. 


                                                                                   
    Lawrence
  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,419 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    edited January 24
    HONDO said:

    Sorry Bruce for any confusion unitentionaly caused. I thought my request was clear enough as to what I was asking. All I was wanting you to do to confirm if the following two images are from the U.S. or not. 

    You have confused me now with the mention of Theodore Bruce. Drawn a blank here. 


                                                                                   

    Theodore Bruce auctioned the GWTW poster in question as well as this "Publicity" material
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,419 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    darolo said:

    Thanks!  Don't know how I missed it first time around...
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,419 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Is "sheeter" (as in One Sheeter) ever used in US press material?  I know it was used a lot on Aussie stuff...
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • BruceBruce Member, Captain Movie Poster Posts: 1,128 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    HONDO said:

    Sorry Bruce for any confusion unitentionaly caused. I thought my request was clear enough as to what I was asking. All I was wanting you to do to confirm if the following two images are from the U.S. or not. 

    You have confused me now with the mention of Theodore Bruce. Drawn a blank here. 


                                                                                   
    Chris answered both your questions, while I was away! Theodore Bruce is the name of the person who sold these, so I thought you might have messaged HIM, and were waiting for him to answer.

    And yes, the use of "sheeter" guarantees this is Australian and not English or U.S., because I don't believe ANY other country used this term.

    I DO have a 1939 U.S. pressbook, and when I get a chance, I could look to see if it has this same section. But I am awfully busy!
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  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector

    I should have picked up on the Theodore Bruce connection. Up too late at night.

    Interestingly no image of a daybill pictured, and possibly even as far as I can see a mention of one.
    Lawrence
  • darolodarolo Member Posts: 56 ✭✭ One-Sheeter
    Bruce Hershenson has it right. The use of 1 sheeter, 3 sheeter etc. seems to be unique to Australia + the 1940 U.S. pressbook has the same cover as this Australian one but the release over there had more than one style of 1 sheet and the pressbook would have pictured and named each style - A or B or whatever. There's no mention of A or B here. Often an Australian press sheet would picture the large paper and not picture the daybill, I have many examples of it. Many press sheets didn't picture any posters at all. The 1939 U.S. pressbook pictures the posters in colour, including 5 1 sheets, so this one here ain't that!
  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    edited January 25
    HONDO said:
    John Said:

    So just to clarify the one sheet with the text only is a second printing. I would definitely agree with that. What exactly are you calling the Bill Collins one sheet?

    My answer is that the Bill Collins poster, based on the evidence presented, has to be from the 1940 Australian roadshow first release. This then confirms my earlier thinking that this was probably the case.

    I agree with Lawrence that the Bill Collins/Theodore Bruce one sheet must surely be an original 1940 first release. The question remains why Theodore Bruce referred to it as a 1942 re release.

    I think it is also possible/likely that there may have been more than one style of one sheet for the Australian release of GWTW. The film was obviously going to be a blockbuster and there were a number of different styles printed for the original US release.

    PS Unfortunately, I didn't purchase the poster at the auction. I missed seeing it unfortunately but a customer of mine asked whether I thought it might be original so thought I would get everyone else's thoughts on it.
    Post edited by John on
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    darolo said:
    Bruce Hershenson has it right. The use of 1 sheeter, 3 sheeter etc. seems to be unique to Australia + the 1940 U.S. pressbook has the same cover as this Australian one but the release over there had more than one style of 1 sheet and the pressbook would have pictured and named each style - A or B or whatever. There's no mention of A or B here. Often an Australian press sheet would picture the large paper and not picture the daybill, I have many examples of it. Many press sheets didn't picture any posters at all. The 1939 U.S. pressbook pictures the posters in colour, including 5 1 sheets, so this one here ain't that!
    Agree 100% the Bill Collins poster is a first release 1940 Australian one sheet poster. I just had to dot the i's and cross the t's. 
    Lawrence
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,915 admin
    And yes, the use of "sheeter" guarantees this is Australian and not English or U.S....

    IDK thought it would have been spelled "Sheetah"...  :smile:


    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
  • JohnJohn Member, Dealer Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    I will have some new information about the GWTW Aust one sheets soon.
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