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Spot The Poster Errors

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  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited September 2019




    .   
    Morning Departure ( 1950 ).  Brisbane Qld. 1951 publised Australian newspaper advertisement.  Wow! What about this one then? Talk about improvising. This has to be one of my favourites and your thoughts would be appreciated?   

    There are seven remaining earlier published  entries not solved or commented on yet. If anyone is interested in receiving some clues let me know, otherwise I will provide the answers at some time or another.
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector

    Allright then, it certainly apppears that this one was far too hard, so to sum it up then.





    The Mobster ( aka Dillinger - 1945 ) Australian first release Australian newspaper advertisement from 1954, containing a scene borrowed from an earlier Australian film  released  two years earlier.



    ( Chris & Trove images ).

    Highway 301 ( 1950 ). Australian Warner Bros.daybill from the Australian 1952 release, and an Australian newspaper advertisement also from 1952. Both contain the same original  scene later depicted in the United Artists first release of The Mobster in 1954.


    Lawrence
  • CSM_2_Point_0CSM_2_Point_0 Member, Super Sleuth Posts: 1,310 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Unfortunately that Highway 301 isn’t mine.  In fact i’d never seen a daybill for it until now.  So thanks Lawrence! 😊
    -Chris

    There's a street of lights

    A long dark night
    Restaurant scenes
    And dark machines...

  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    Unfortunately that Highway 301 isn’t mine.  In fact i’d never seen a daybill for it until now.  So thanks Lawrence! 😊                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Thanks for pointing that out to me Chris. It was apparently  the U.S.A. insert poster that you once displayed on the forum, which also has the same scene depicted, that I was thinking was one of your many film-noir daybills.



    No idea now where the long held daybill image originated from then.
    Lawrence
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,342 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    Unfortunately that Highway 301 isn’t mine.  In fact i’d never seen a daybill for it until now.  So thanks Lawrence! 😊
    Oh no.  I could hear the groan of frustration all the way over here!
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    HONDO said:
                                                                          
                                                                                                                                



    What's out of order here ?


    Another one to finalise. 

    Firstly the name of the film is Tarzan And The Leopard Woman, and not Tarzan And The Leopard Women  as printed on the two posters in question.

     ( John ).


    Secondly on the following poster it states ''New Tarzan Adventures''.  This daybill and the other earlier displayed one are post 1958 printings and not from the first 1940's Australia release of the film. When RKO went out of business and folded up in Australia, MGM in 1958 secured all unnrelesed RKO Product and apparently  some back catalogue product. including this Tarzan title. No way then is the advertising of new Tarzan adventures accurate.





    Robert Burton didn't start printing MGM daybills until 1962 so the following poster has to be a 1962 or onwards printing. I found a screening in Australia of this title in 1964.





    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    HONDO said:
                                                                         


    Something different here in this newspaper advertisement from 1945.                                                                         
    The answer to this one is The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp was the official release title, and not The Life And Loves Of Colonal Blimp, as altered to on the Australian newspaper advertisement. Some unofficial tampering happened here. Loves and not death more likely to attract audiences perhaps?




    Out of interest perhaps is that the 1956 film Death Of A Scoundrel had an official title change to Loves Of A Scoundrel when screened in Australia. I am sure I once read somewhere, but can't find the article now, that the title change was due to lacklustre box office receipts, and by changing death to loves possibly would help in attracting audiences in  overseas markets.
     




    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited October 2019
    HONDO said:
                                                                      
    Drums Across The River ( 1954 ) Australian duotone daybill. Something here isn't accurate.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Firstly, in answering this one, the image on the above daybill poster has an image of a man holding two pistols. Audie Murphy in his western films always used only one gun and not two. The following still and U.S.A. one sheet confirm this practice in Drums Along The River.


                                       
    No proof, but I believe that the duotone daybill image was copied from an image of Rod Cameron appearing in Stampede. Although Stampede was released in the U.S. in 1949 the film was only released in Australia in 1954, so the artwork should have been accessable when the Drums Across The River duotone daybill would have been designed.



    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    HONDO said:
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  



    Borderline ( 1950 ). Re-release daybill. Is it just me or does the top image remind you of another film ?



    No proof with this one, but as with the case of the earlier featured daybill of Don't Trust Your Husband, the Borderline daybill poster was also designed and printed by F. Cunninghame, and again the poster images weren't copied from the original films artwork. It would appear the F. Cunninghame company didn't receive any artwork to work with for Borderline along with Don't Trust Your Husband, so the poster artist had to use his of her imagination. Both posters. apart from the film's title, have the only other credit being displayed of Fred MacMurray's name and that's all. IFD were a fledgling business and just starting off in the Australian film distribution industry in Australia around the time that both the re-releases happened. No excuse, but possiiblly inexperience may have contributed somewhat in the error with the two poster designs. 

    I believe that Key Largo ( 1948 ) was the insipiration for the Borderline artwork for the following reasons.

    1 ) Claire Trevor's dress worn and the holding of the cigarette featured on the daybill are similar to the Claire Trevor Key Largo still below.  

    2 ) Although altered somewhat the men look like Bogart and Robinson.

    3 ) The gun held by Bogart is the same syle as held by Robinson in the Key Largo still. A complely different gun was used by Fred MacMurray in the film Borderline as shown on Australian daybill image shown below. 
     



     

    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    HONDO said:
                                                                          
                                                                                                                                             


    The Plunderers ( 1948 ). What is out of place with this Australian newspaper advertisement placed in 1949.



    Original U.S.A. one sheet artwork and an Australian one sheet of The Plunderers.This film was set in the 1870's and the poster features Sioux indians in the artwork, along with Rod Cameron's clothes and the females attire are appropriate for that period.



    This image depicted on the Australian newspaper advertisement for The Plunderer  is actually from Last of The Redmen ( 1947 ),  which was based on the Last Of The Mohicans novel set in 1757. It features a huron indian from a different part of the U.S.A. over a decade before.







    This other image from the Australian advertisement , although no proof it was borrowed from Last Of The Redmen, is certainly from an earlier period than the 1870's, when The Plunderers was set.



    No idea where this image originated from.

    It would appear that the advertisement used for The Plunderers, for whatever reason adapted previously used material.


    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    Something out of the normal here with a non Australian entry.

    Jungle Princess ( 1958 ). Egyptian film and according to Bruce the first poster is from the original release and the second one from a 1960's re-release.

    Notice the original language titles are a little different in their spelling and also the incorrect English spelling of Jungle Princess on the first image.

    Saying all that it also appears to me something else isn't right on both posters. Any idea?
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector




    Tarzan And The Lost Safari ( 1957 ).

    It certainly appears to me that the the images appearing on the two Egyptian posters of the jungle man were inspired by the Gordon Scott pose as Tarzan from  the slightly earlier U.K. film Tarzan And The Lost Safari.

    On the following image advertising the Egyptian Jungle Princess, the leading man doesn't have a sheath for his knife around his waist.


    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    HONDO said:




    .   
    Morning Departure ( 1950 ).  Brisbane Qld. 1951 publised Australian newspaper advertisement.  Wow! What about this one then? Talk about improvising. This has to be one of my favourites and your thoughts would be appreciated?   

    There are seven remaining earlier published  entries not solved or commented on yet. If anyone is interested in receiving some clues let me know, otherwise I will provide the answers at some time or another.

     Morning Departure ( 1950 ) original Australian daybill, an authenic Australian newspaper advertisement and a U.K. quad film poster. As one can see the film was a realistic World War 11 film. The makeshift image that I displayed originally portrays the film appearing to be an undersea action, adventure and crime film 

    The main character's image would seem to have been inspired by Glenn Ford's pose used in the artwork of Adventures Of Martin Eden (1942 ). It certainly appears that someone was trying to create some material  to publisise Morning Departure without going through the usual channels. This practice of improvising I have found was used many times, particually in the 1940s and 1950s. This example has to be the most inaccurate attempt to save a few pounds by not going through proper channels that I have ever seen.  



    Original U.S.A. insert poster, a later printing of an Australian daybill  and the scene from the original posted Australian makeshift advertisement.
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited November 2019








    With The Virginian, Rope and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty Australian newspaper advertisements and the Wyoming daybill appearing above something isn't quite right within the images. I am thinking that none of these errors should be difficult to spot.

    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited November 2019
      

       

    Probably the last new poster image here on this thread that I will contribute.                                                                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                            


    It certainly appears to me interest in this information delivered by me on this thread is becoming of little interest to the majority of forum members.

    Answers, attempted answers, comments or reaction acknowledgements have become extremely rare.

    The amount of time I spend  working on this thread, with no feedback forthcoming seemingly appears to me that there is very little interest these days, and therefore has me thinking is it mainly a case of me now just entertaing myself?

    Please let me know your thoughts.


    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector

      ( Wil )

    Australian one sheet previously featured on this thread and a newly discovered Australian daybill stock poster that was used in New Zealand.

    James Stewart's name was added to the daybill in New Zealand usage, in this particulat case at least.

    One would have to think then that the two posters would have been printed around the same period. 

    Call Northside 777 was released in Australia in 1948, and was the year that the Not suitable for general exhibition censorship rating changed to Not suiitable for children. As the Australian one sheet also has the same censorship rating featured on it, one has to think that it was printed around the time of the first Australian 1948 release, or was it? Maybe it was a much later printing and with an oversight the original censorship rating was incorrectly used.  

     The following original Australian daybill displays the Not suitable for general exhibition rating



    Original Australian daybill and a most likely late 1950's stock re-release daybill poster.

    The Australian stock daybill was printed by Robert Burton who only started printing 20th Century Fox posters circa 1957, thus making this poster a post 1957 re-release printing. The interesting thing here is that the daybill credits would appear to have been sourched from the Australian one sheet material, which had also left off James Stewart's name.

     Very odd indeed, leaving one to ponder if that the one sheet and daybill stock posters were both printed for the same late 1950's re-release or not? We know the daybill was but was the one sheet?


    Lawrence
  • SvenSven Member Posts: 2,381 ✭✭✭✭ Three-Sheeter
    Great movie and daybill (wish i owned the daybill)
    Extremely bizarre that Jimmy was left off the main credits in the stock posters. Surely a mistake?
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    Australian The Film Weekly trade magazine Warner Bros advertisement from May 17 1951. Whoever was responsible for putting this ad together appears to have been either lazy or incompetent. Instead of using a correct White Heat image they used an image of James Cagney from the awaiting to be released Kiss Me Tomorrow, as appearing below.




    Original White Heat advertising Australian and U.S.A. various material below. Notice the gun Cagney is holding is different from the one he used in Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye.



    White Heat first Australian release appears to have been in in Brisbane Qld. Australia February 1951 and Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye in Sydney N.S.W. on September 7 1951.
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    HONDO said:








    With The Virginian, Rope and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty Australian newspaper advertisements and the Wyoming daybill appearing above something isn't quite right within the images. I am thinking that none of these errors should be difficult to spot.

    FINALISING -

    The Virginian ( 1946 ) Joel McCrea's billing should have appeared first, as it appears on the Australian daybill following. 



    The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty ( 1947 / 1962 re-issue ) U.K. censorship classification incorrectly used.

    Rope ( 1948 ) No image of James Stewart to be seen.

    Wyoming ( 1947 ) William Elliott should have been first billed and where is his image as it appears on the original U.S.A. insert poster?


    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited December 2019




    A 1964 Australian newspaper advertisement  advertising a western double feature programme. The two scenes depicted here are from two different films. Any ideas of the film tiles for the images ?
    Post edited by HONDO on
    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector



    The answer is images from other films used to promote Bullwhip ( 1958 ) and Naked In The Sun ( 1957 ) film screenings. Glenn Ford from The Sheepman ( 1958 ) and the gun image from Tension At Tagle Rock ( 1956 ).

     I'm sure someone had mentioned in the past on the forum regarding the five chamber pistol image oddity, but it cannot be found now by seaching for Tension At Table Rock. 


    Lawrence
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    edited December 2019


                                                                                                      Something out of place here.
    Lawrence
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,779 admin
    They are wearing parachutes...
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,779 admin
    or not... Perhaps the subject for the poster:


    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,779 admin
    They had oxygen masks too... I'm at a loss.
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector


    Does this other designed Belgian poster image help in any way, or does it just add to the confusion?
    Lawrence
  • jayn_jjayn_j Member, Singin Dancing Fool, Lobby Master Posts: 698 ✭✭✭ Daybiller
    Well, it really doesn't look like John Wayne in the first one.
    Also, they seem to be running toward a plane with a jet engine on a wing.
    - Jay -
    Curmudgeon in training 
  • theartofmovieposterstheartofmovieposters Member Posts: 4,342 ✭✭✭✭✭ Elite Collector
    I'm with Jay, looks nothing like him.
  • HONDOHONDO Member Posts: 8,721 ✭✭✭✭✭✭ Le Grande Collector
    I'm with Jay, looks nothing like him.
    A little resemblance to Humphrey Bogart perhaps.

    jayn_j said:
    Also, they seem to be running toward a plane with a jet engine on a wing.
    You are getting warmer.
    Lawrence
  • CharlieCharlie Member, Administrator, Moderator, Game Master Posts: 6,779 admin
    Running towards planes that were just blown up?
    That second mouse in the bowl of cream we call life...
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